Meet Pam

Creative Entrepreneur

She felt deeply unfulfilled from her 9-to-5 job - which led her on the quest to find work that uses her full potential, and that she'd be happy to do everyday. This exploration led her to photography, which she now does full-time.

My name is Pam

I help fun-loving humans liberate their inner artist and achieve creative confidence through high-quality, intentional and actionable resources on creativity, art, and personal development

I am an alumna of The Purposeful Creative & I took up the following programs:

My name is Regina.

I am a photographer. I capture natural and real emotions among my subjects (couples and families). I've been doing this full-time since 2015, and have grown and hired a team in 2018.

I am an alumna of The Purposeful Creative & I took up the following programs:

How She Got Started

Your first job was at a bank… what led

I have always been 100% into arts and crafts. As I young student, I would always go above and beyond on all the art projects and inject art into the most technical subjects like Math and Science. I used to always decorate the front page and dividers of my Math and Science clearbook (the one where you keep all the quizzes, homework, etc.), my notes were always colorful, and the best birthday gift you could give to me then was the all-in-one art set that comes in this huge foldable book-like packaging.

What was the final trigger that really pushed you to take the leap & start your photography career?

I always knew that I would quit my corporate job someday but I wanted to be a little more strategic about it. I wanted to make sure that I had enough financial security and a good plan before I officially took the leap.

Having said that, I actually took the leap three months earlier than I had originally planned.

The final trigger? It became VERY hard for me to get up in the morning and go to my day job. I would make up excuses to keep working from home or even call in “sick” sometimes. When I do manage to get to work, I just watch Youtube most of the time and doing just the very bare minimum. I realized then that I was being very unfair to my team, to the company and to myself. I couldn’t stand living a kind of life where the moment I wake up, I wish the day would already come to an end. I asked myself if I was okay spending the next three months feeling this miserable, uninspired and unmotivated. I was very proud of myself when I finally admitted that enough is enough.

I couldn’t stand living a kind of life where the moment I wake up, I wish the day would already come to an end.

What was the best piece of business/leadership advice you were given when you were starting off?

“Define your enough number.” Money is very important to me. As someone who grew up in a very modest household, money to me always meant freedom.

When it finally sunk in that I don’t need MORE money but rather, ENOUGH money to have the freedom that I desired, I started to make decisions that are more aligned with my values.


I stopped chasing after more clients, more courses, more products, more anything. I started becoming intentional about where I want to spend my energy in. I stopped saying yes to things I didn’t enjoy just because it would give me the quick cash.

It was easier to see where I was headed because I defined how much was enough for me; it wasn’t some vague idea of “more money.”

When it finally sunk in that I don’t need MORE money but rather, ENOUGH money to have the freedom that I desired, I started to make decisions that are more aligned with my values.

Her Journey (So Far): The Wins and Joys

What is the best part of your job?

When I get to spend an entire day just doing all sorts of things in my sketchbook!

Imagine who you were and where your career/business was a year ago. In the past year, what have been 3 of your most tangible achievements?

  1. Stable monthly income that is even higher than my corporate job income.
  2. I managed to upgrade my equipment (laptop, camera, etc.) so I can do what I do better, more efficiently and more conveniently.
  3. I have launched my new website, AmateurCreatives.com, and I have a solid plan for the long term.

I’ve had a lot of screw ups, lots of failures and lots of obstacles. But each time, I would always find a way to pick myself back up and try again.

What’s the thing in your life/career now that still makes you go, “Wow, I never thought I’d be the type of person who’d be able to do/achieve this.”

I still can’t believe that I get to wake up and decide on what I want to do.

What behavior or personality trait do you most attribute to your success – or getting where you are now?

Persistence, definitely. In this journey of mine. I’ve had a lot of screw ups, lots of failures and lots of obstacles. But each time, I would always find a way to pick myself back up and try again.

Roadblocks & Self-Doubt

When you were just starting out, what was the biggest roadblock that was holding you back?

The feeling of not having enough hours in a day. I struggled so much with this. At the peak of my busy-ness, I only had time to sleep when I was in a bus to/from work. My corporate job takes at least 15 hours of my day, I even have to work on holidays and sometimes, even the rest days. This led to developing a lot of unhealthy habits, dropping the ball on some of my responsibilities (both at my day job and in my business), and just feeling downright horrible all the time.

What’s your #1 go-to thing to do when self-doubt creeps up on you?

I do a 180 and do something just for the fun of it – I would try a new creative technique, I would watch a new k-drama, do a long skincare routine or treat myself to a nice meal. Generally, I find that letting myself feel joy outside of my work tends to get me excited about getting back to my work and figuring out how to get unstuck.

What’s the hardest part about your job?

Being a one-woman team! I’m my own boss, photographer, videographer, writer, designer, accountant, everything. There are so many moving parts in the business – not just the things that I love doing – and I have to be on top of it all.

What’s the most meaningful part of your job?

When I get e-mails from people who follow my work telling me that I gave them courage to try something they’ve always wanted to try, it truly warms my heart!

Let’s Talk About The F Word: Finances

Note: We want to get more women talking about money more openly. It’s such a useful and educational topic to have – and we want to encourage more discussions about it. So, here we go!

How much capital did you need to start your business?

Honestly, zero. Technically, there’s the cost of my Adobe Creative Cloud subscription and hosting but I had those before already. The thing about being an online business with digital products and services is that you can get started with very minimal cost.

How did you decide on your financial goals when you first started your business?

The one gauge that I have to assure myself that I was ready to become a full-time business owner was that I need to earn at least the same amount of money that I get in my corporate job for at least a year.

Now that I’ve achieved that, the next financial goal would be for me to be able to build certain funds (Emergency Fund, Health Insurance Fund, etc.) in the next year.

What’s your personal definition of a life of abundance? 

Abundance to me means FREEDOM. I want to know that I have options in life, that I’m not just forced into something because I couldn’t afford anything else.

Something tangible would be: traveling and not skimping out on everything, having a yoga studio membership, going to cafes, and enrolling in courses or workshops that I want.

I want to know that I have options in life, that I’m not just forced into something because I couldn’t afford anything else.

At this point in your business, do you still get worried about sustaining your business and lifestyle long-term?

Yes, I’m still very much worried but now, I’m very optimistic. Right now, I still do two things: run Amateur Creatives and work as a virtual assistant for one client. I still have the virtual assistant job because it’s something that I am very good at and it pays the bills. This removes any pressure from my true passion – Amateur Creatives – and I’m able to make more intentional decisions for it.

Slowly, I will transition to doing Amateur Creatives full-time and this is how I’ve always done it. Slow and steady and stable. If I had forced myself to make Amateur Creatives profitable from the get-go, I’m pretty sure I would burned out by now!

Looking Forward: Pam’s Next Braver Goals

What’s the next big/challenging goal you’re working towards?

Creating an audience for Amateur Creatives – starting from scratch is always hard! I often feel like I’m shouting in an empty room but we all have to start from somewhere, right?

What quotation or saying inspires you and motivates you to be yourself and do what you love?

“What if I fall? Oh, but my darling, what if you fly?”

And I always keep this in mind: “Do whatever brings you to life, then. Follow your own fascinations, obsessions, and compulsions. Trust them. Create whatever causes a revolution in your heart.”

What’s the biggest mindset or skill or takeaway that you learned from The Purposeful Creative that managed to get ingrained in yourself and the way you now do things?

The whole design-thinking process! Especially the part about creating an MVP (minimum viable product), launching quickly, getting feedback, improving the product again and again. I used to always want to launch with the biggest, baddest version of my product but that has led to burning myself out even before launching, overpromising and underdelivering.

How has your business changed your life? Who has it allowed you to become, and where has the journey taken you?

I have never felt more alive, really. While I was struggling at my day job trying to be good at things that I didn’t even like doing, I felt helpless day in and out. I felt like I wasn’t good enough, and that I was stupid. But whenever I switch hats and work on my business, I feel that I am in charge of my life and that I get to have the freedom to be creative, to try new things and to connect with people who feel the same way. I’ve also become a lot more truthful to myself as I’ve gotten to know myself better.

I’ve also become a lot more truthful to myself as I’ve gotten to know myself better.

What is your ultimate goal? What’s the bigger Why behind what you do?

My ultimate goal is to inspire and guide even just a tiny handful of people to embrace their creativity and to be confident in whatever they make WHILE living a life that sustains me and my passions.

Keep on experimenting because you’ll never truly figure out what you’re 100% passionate about when you’re not even letting yourself experience it.

– Pam Llaguno

What advice would you give to a young woman who is… scared to start or fail because – what other people will think?

Everytime you worry about what other people will think, stop for a bit and ask yourself, “What do you think about yourself regarding this? How would you feel when you finally give yourself permission to start?” I think the answers to those are the only ones that truly matter.

What advice would you give to a young woman who is… feels hindered by the fact that she doesn’t have money to start?

I hear you! This is where I started, I even had negative money (hello debt!). Don’t be afraid of your finances. One big mistake that people with debt or zero capital tend to do is to be afraid of checking their numbers. Look at it often and see how you can slowly make it work for you.

What advice would you give to a young woman who is... struggling with finding the motivation or push to begin? (aka making all the excuses and procrastinating)

Give yourself small goals and small rewards. Oftentimes, we make excuses because the goal that we want to achieve is so far ahead of us that it seems that anything we do now wouldn’t even take us three steps closer to success. If you can see a goal right in front of you, it’s a lot easier to motivate myself to push a little harder.

What advice would you give to a young woman who is… thinking, “What if I’m not good enough?”

Do it anyway. If after all your hard work, you still feel that you weren’t good enough, then at least you know for sure and you can take clear steps to improving yourself, if you want to. The trick here is to remove “what if” from the equation. Don’t trip yourself up before you even start to walk!

Ready to follow Regina’s lead & take *YOUR* next brave steps towards a life of passion+purpose?

Check out the workshops she attended with us: